A U.K. tech company launched the world’s first hand-held test that analyzes fingerprints for illegal drugs and other substances in a matter of minutes.

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I know this is supposed to be scary, but it walks like it’s whistling a jaunty tune.  And just try not to laugh when it starts doing push-ups.  

Designed by Boston Dynamics (possibly the real-world inspiration for Fringe’s Massive Dynamic?), this is the latest in a series of robots that are incredible to say the least.  

For reference check out Big Dog, a quadrupedal machine-beast that can take a full leg-shove to the side and recover like it’s nothing. Perhaps most elegant and astounding is the way it recovers from a nasty slip on some black ice.   

(Source: Boston.com)

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That’s no photshopped image.  The fully submersible sQuba drives on land and flies through water.  
Swiss car maker and camel-case enthusiast Frank Rinderknecht made this car in honor of his beloved James Bond, who drove a car underwater in “The Spy Who Loved Me.”  
Check out this awesome list for more present defying-ly cool underwater technologies.  

That’s no photshopped image.  The fully submersible sQuba drives on land and flies through water.  

Swiss car maker and camel-case enthusiast Frank Rinderknecht made this car in honor of his beloved James Bond, who drove a car underwater in “The Spy Who Loved Me.”  

Check out this awesome list for more present defying-ly cool underwater technologies.  

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Another uncanny robot from the makers of Geminoid.  Meet Actroid-F.  The best part? The website proclaims that “she is the robot working girl.”  

Meet Geminoid, a sometimes disturbingly life-like robot that a Japanese professor made in his own image.  Professor Hiroshi Ishiguro of Osaka University designed the robot using a mold of his own body, he programmed it with his own voice and mannerisms and implanted his own hair into its head.

And he seems to have started a trend.  There are two other robots built off of human counterparts, one a young female and one a white man.  The androids are made by Kokoro Inc., a division of Sanrio, the same company that brings you Hello Kitty.

Geminoid DK in the making

The robots are only animated from the shoulders up, which means they must be carried (or strapped to a chair and wheeled about) to get from place to place.

The Geminoid series is operated remotely using a facial motion capture system. Legend has it that Ishiguro uses his to avoid having to leave his seat to go to board meetings, but it’s main purpose is apparently to study human-robot interactions.

Electromagnets to treat depression

I would love to know if anyone has tried this:  

Neuronetics' NeuroStar system

Neuronetics Inc. is paving the way for a new type of depression therapy, a non-invasive electromagnetic field treatment designed to stimulate brain cells linked to depression.

Bruce Shook, co-founder, president & CEO, talked to MassDevice about pioneering the market for the only FDA-cleared transcranial magnetic stimulation system to date, his company’s NeuroStar TMS system.

The therapy, which won the FDA nod in 2008, is a rarity in the med-tech world: A device-based approach to a psychiatric disorder.

"The only other widely used device-based therapy in psychiatry is shock therapy, and that’s been around since the 1930s," Shook told us.

Here’s the rest, and check out the podcast.  

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Terminator tech: Frightful or Freakin’ awesome?

MedGadgetGerman researchers have build a robotic arm with fingers that can exert 30 newtons of force at its fingertips.  

It’s one of the strongest hands ever built, according to the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), where the arm was developed.  

Look at this beast - it’s fantastic in that it’s both terrifying and exhilarating.  

In a filmed demonstration, a researcher whacks at the fingers with a freaking hammer, and the fingers bounce right back.  

luke skywalker’s bionic arm? should be obsolete in a couple months.

watching this at first i thought it must be faked.  but it’s on the BBC’s site, with multiple videos and sources.  clicking on the image below leads to the YouTube page.  

german prosthetics company Otto Bock manufactures the hand in the video, as well as a slew of other prosthetics for knees, feet, and specialty prosthetics for kids.  check out this “transcarpal hand:” 

Otto Bock's transcarpal hand